Robert Taylor Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Robert Taylor, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Robert Taylor's prints in one place.  Robert Taylor Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company. Order with Confidence with Cranston Fine Arts aviation art publisher and distributor for over 24 years.


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Publishing historical art since 1985

 

Aviation Print Packs
Pack 672. Pack of two Hawker Typhoon prints by Robert Taylor and Robin Smith.
Closing the Gap by Robert Taylor. (AP)

Closing the Gap by Robert Taylor. (AP)
The Dreaded Salvo by Robin Smith.

The Dreaded Salvo by Robin Smith.
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Battle of Britain Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Valiant Response by Robert Taylor.
Valiant Response by Robert Taylor.
A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.

A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.
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Pack 756. Pack of two Thunderbolt aircraft prints by Robert Taylor and Nicolas Trudgian.
The Wolfpack by Robert Taylor. (B)

The Wolfpack by Robert Taylor. (B)
Thunderbolts and Lightnings by Nicolas Trudgian. (AP)

Thunderbolts and Lightnings by Nicolas Trudgian. (AP)
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Gunther Rall Luftwaffe Ace Signed Aviation Prints by Simon Atack and Robert Taylor.
Eagle Strike by Simon Atack.

Eagle Strike by Simon Atack.
Dawn Eagles Rising by Robert Taylor.
Dawn Eagles Rising by Robert Taylor.
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Pack of two artist proof edition WW1 aviation prints by Nicolas Trudgian and Robert Taylor.
The Biff Boys by Robert Taylor.

The Biff Boys by Robert Taylor.
Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian (AP)

Knights of the Sky by Nicolas Trudgian (AP)
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Latest Robert Taylor  Releases : 

 The engineers at Rolls-Royce had worked their magic.  They had somehow managed to squeeze every available ounce of power out of the current Merlin engine and by D-Day on 6 June 1944 the sleek Mk.IX Spitfires of Fighter Command reigned supreme in the skies over Normandy.  The magnificent Mk.IXs were, by far, the most numerous variant of Spitfires that fought from D-Day to the threshold of the Reich.  In the great drive from Normandy across northern France, Belgium and into Holland the Spitfire pilots of Fighter Command threw down the gauntlet to any Luftwaffe pilots brave enough, or foolhardy enough, to tangle with them.  Perhaps the greatest pilot to ever fly the Spitfire was the RAF&39;s top fighter Ace Johnnie Johnson.  His resolute determination and steadfast leadership came into its own during D-Day and the subsequent advance through Normandy, and he would finish the war as the highest scoring Allied Ace in Europe.  The scene captures the moment when, as Wing Leader of 127 Canadian Wing, Johnnie is seen leading Mk.IX Spitfires from 421 <i>Red Indian</i> Squadron RCAF out on patrol from their airfield at Evère near Brussels on a cold December morning in 1944.  It is close to the fighting and the German front line so, as the Canadians climb steadily out over the snow clad landscape in the golden light of dawn, they are already alert and on the lookout for the first signs of trouble.

Midwinter Dawn by Robert Taylor.
 Without air supremacy D-Day and the invasion of north-west Europe would never have happened, and the tactical Ninth Air Force played a huge part in securing that position.  The Ninth had fought with distinction from the deserts of North Africa to the invasion of Sicily and the fighting in Italy.  They had spearheaded the assault on Ploesti and, from humble beginnings, had grown into one of the finest and most formidable Air Forces in the USAAF.  Then, in October 1943, the Ninth were sent to England for their greatest challenge so far - providing air support for the US First Army during the forthcoming invasion of Normandy.  By the morning of 6th June 1944 the Ninth was the largest and most effective tactical air force in the world, with over a quarter of a million personnel and more than 3,500 fighters, bombers and troop-carriers under its command.  Amongst them were the P-47s of the 365th Fighter Group - the fearsome <i>Hell Hawks</i> - a unit that by the end of World War Two would become legendary.  Amongst the first to use P-47s as fighter-bombers, the <i>Hell Hawks</i> were hard at work softening up the enemy in the build up to D-Day, dive-bombing bridges, rail lines, gun positions and airfields.  With two 1,000-pound bombs below their wings along with ten 5-in rockets and eight .50 calibre machine guns, their enormous firepower devastated the German defenses on D-Day.  The <i>Hell Hawks</i> supported the army throughout the Normandy campaign, all the way across northern France to the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944, and beyond.  It was a harsh nomadic life, eating and sleeping in tents and moving from one temporary strip to the next.  By the end of hostilities in May 1945 the <i>Hell Hawks</i> had moved through 11 different airfields, more than any other fighter-bomber group in the Ninth Air Force.
Hell Hawks Over Utah by Robert Taylor.
 <p align=center><i>Rising Sun is normally a companion print to The Legend of Colin Kelly.  We have one available to sell individually.</i></b><br>

Rising Sun by Robert Taylor.
 P-40s of the AVG Flying Tigers 3rd Pursuit Squadron - Hell's Angels - surprise the enemy with a deadly strafing attack on a Japanese forward air-base in China, summer 1942. With their Allison engines screaming at full throttle, AVG Aces Tommy Haywood and Robert Smith, lead the charge as the Hell's Angels leave a trail of havoc and destruction behind them. Robert Taylor has created a masterpiece to honor the Flying Tigers and the release is autographed by legendary Aces including four of the AVG's most respected pilots who, since signing, have sadly passed away, giving even greater meaning to this edition.

Flying Tigers - The Stuff of Legend by Robert Taylor.

 

FEATURED SIGNATURE



Flt Lieutenant Bob Knights DSO, DFC (deceased)

A member of the elite 617 Dambusters squadron, Bob Knights had a key role on the night before D-Day. With the rest of the squadron he flew on Operation Taxable which simulated the approach of the invasion across the Pas de Calais by dropping metal strips of window to a very precise pattern. The enemy was completely deceived and kept most of their best troops on the wrong side of the Seine. Bob Knights had already flown a full operational tour with 619 Squadron Lancasters, including eight trips to Berlin, before volunteering for 617 Squadron. Under Cheshire he flew on some of the squadrons most challenging precision operations and later under Willie Tait took part in the attack that finally destroyed the Tirpitz. Seconded to BOAC in December 1944 he stayed with the airline after the war for a 30 year long career. He died 4th December 2004.

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Featured Aircraft



Typhoon

Single engine fighter with a maximum speed of 412 mph at 19,000 feet and a ceiling of 35,200 feet. range 510 miles. The Typhoon was armed with twelve browning .303inch machine guns in the wings (MK1A) Four 20mm Hispano cannon in wings (MK!B) Two 1000ilb bombs or eight 3-inch rockets under wings. The first proto type flew in February 1940, but due to production problems the first production model flew in May 1941. with The Royal Air Force receiving their first aircraft in September 1941. Due to accidents due to engine problems (Sabre engine) The Hawker Typhoon started front line service in December 1941.The Hawker Typhoon started life in the role of interceptor around the cost of England but soon found its real role as a ground attack aircraft. especially with its 20mm cannon and rockets. This role was proved during the Normandy landings and the period after. The total number of Hawker typhoons built was 3,330.

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All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 The swaggering figure of the Reichsmarshal swept imperiously into the Air Ministry on Berlin's Wilhemstrasse, his jewel-encrusted baton and extravagant uniform as flamboyant as ever. This was Saturday, 30th January 1943, the tenth Anniversary of the Nazi Party coming to power, and Goering was about to deliver the main speech in tribute to the Party and its leader, the Fuhrer - Adolf Hitler.  The Royal Air Force had other plans for the anniversary.  In stark defiance of the imagined air security safeguarding Berlin, brave pilots of 105 and 139 Sqn's took to the air in de Havilland Mosquitoes, on course for Germany.  Their mission: RAF Bomber Command's first daylight raid on Berlin!  The raid was timed to perfection and three Mosquitoes of 105 Sqn raced headlong, low level towards their target - the Haus des Rundfunks, headquarters of the German State broadcasting company.  It was an hour before Goering could finally be broadcast.  He was boiling with rage and humiliation.  A few hours later, adding further insult, Mosquitoes from 139 Sqn swept over the city in a second attack moments before Goebbels addressed a Nazi mass rally in the Sportpalast.  Goering's promise that enemy aircraft would never fly over the Reich was broken, the echo of that shame would haunt him for the rest of the war.  This  dramatic painting pays tribute to this pivotal moment in the war, capturing the Mosquito B.Mk.IVs of 105 Sqn departing the target area, following their successful strike on the Haus des Rundfunk.

Strike on Berlin by Anthony Saunders.
 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman.
 B-17G 2107027 is depicted limping home to Bassingbourn with the starboard outer propeller feathered following a raid during the Summer of 1944.  'Hikin' for Home' served with the 322nd Bomb Sqn, 91st Bomb Group as part of the 8th Air Force.  Escorting her home is Major George Preddy, the highest scoring P-51 pilot and sixth in the list of all-time top American Aces, seen here flying 413321 'Cripes a Mighty 3rd'.

Hikin' for Home by Ivan Berryman.
Wellington Mk.III X3671 of 156 Sqn piloted by P/O Fox is depicted laying mines in the Estuary of the Loire on the night of 16th April 1942 in the Bay of Biscay.  Just three days later, P/O Fox failed to return from a similar 'Gardening' sortie whilst flying Wellington X3485.

A Spot of Gardening by Ivan Berryman.
 Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane is shown flying Spitfire Vb BM308 of No.154 Sqn based at Southend in 1942.

Tribute to Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane by Ivan Berryman.
 On Wednesday 22nd June 1938 a new sound was heard over the humid streets of Singapore as four Bristol Pegasus radial engines heralded the arrival of the RAF's newest flying-boat.  For the men of 230 Squadron gathering on the slipway at Seletar, the approaching aircraft looked formidable and even from a distance, they could spot the powerful array of .303 machine guns it possessed.  230 Squadron had been chosen as one of the first units to be re-equipped with the world's most advanced flying boat - the Short Sunderland.  Richard Taylor's painting is a tribute to the outstanding Sunderland and the men who flew it in the Far East.  As the sun beats down on tropical island anchorage a Mk III Sunderland from 230 Squadron unloads essential supplies at a forward base on an archipelago deep in the Indian Ocean.  A second aircraft, breaking a patrol, prepares to land.
Tropical Duties by Richard Taylor.
 Brimming with overconfidence, few on board the Japanese carrier Sōryū noticed the SBD Dauntless bombers gathering overhead.  Within a matter of minutes a few courageous US Navy pilots would change the course of history.  Anthony Saunders' new action-packed painting recreates the scene from the Battle of Midway as the SBD Dauntless pilots pull out of their death-defying dives having delivered their 1000lb bombs perfectly on target with three direct hits on the Japanese carrier.  Already there is utter chaos aboard the Sōryū as exploding ammunition and igniting fuel erupt onto the flight deck from the hangars below.  Secondary explosions rip through the ship, fires rage beyond control and her hull shudders to contain the violent inferno.  The Sōryū is doomed.
Midway - Attack on the Soryu by Anthony Saunders.
 Colonel Steve Pisanos and his wingman in their P-47 Thunderbolts take an opportunity to attack a German train in France, 1944.

Devastating Thunder by Brian Bateman.

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Signatures

Some popular pilot and aircrew signatures from our database of over 2,000 signatures!

Gunther Rall

Johnnie Johnson

Bud Anderson

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Selected prints with Free Shipping

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Bogeys Eleven O Clock High by Robert Taylor (AP)

Bogeys Eleven O Clock High by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £325.00
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Front Line Hurricanes by Robert Taylor (AP)

Front Line Hurricanes by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £360.00
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Rabaul - Fly For Your Life by Robert Taylor. (AP)

Rabaul - Fly For Your Life by Robert Taylor. (AP)
Price : £395.00
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A Time for Heroes by Robert Taylor (B)

A Time for Heroes by Robert Taylor (B)
Price : £275.00
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Viper Venom by Robert Taylor (AP)
Viper Venom by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £325.00
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The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

 

 

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