Robert Taylor Prints . com

All of the superb range of aviation and naval art prints by renowned artist Robert Taylor, in one easy to navigate gallery.  Listing all prints from the RAF, Luftwaffe, United States Air Force and more - all of Robert Taylor's prints in one place.  Robert Taylor Prints . com show all available aviation and naval prints published over the years by the Military Gallery, available from Cranston Fine Arts, the Military and Aviation Art Print Company. Order with Confidence with Cranston Fine Arts aviation art publisher and distributor for over 24 years.


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Aviation Print Packs
Gunther Rall Signed Battle of Britain Aviation Art by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Dawn Eagles Rising by Robert Taylor.
Dawn Eagles Rising by Robert Taylor.
Adolf Galland / Messerschmitt Bf109 E-4 by Ivan Berryman (B)

Adolf Galland / Messerschmitt Bf109 E-4 by Ivan Berryman (B)
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Pilot and Aircrew Signed Lancaster Prints by Robert Taylor and Simon Smith.
Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.

Target Peenemunde by Robert Taylor.
The Shining Sword by Simon Smith.
The Shining Sword by Simon Smith.
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Pack 430. Pack of two German Heinkel He111 aircraft prints by Anthony Saunders and Robert Taylor.
Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders.
Fury of Assault by Robert Taylor.
Fury of Assault by Robert Taylor.
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Robert Taylor Mosquito Aircraft Print Pack
Mosquito into Attack by Robert Taylor
Mosquito into Attack by Robert Taylor
Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
Top Dog by Robert Taylor. (B)
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Supermarine Spitfire Aviation Art Prints by Robert Taylor and Ivan Berryman.
Canadian Wing by Robert Taylor

Canadian Wing by Robert Taylor
Spitfire F Mk21 by Ivan Berryman. (C)

Spitfire F Mk21 by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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Latest Robert Taylor  Releases : 

 On the morning of 15th October 1943, as Bf109G's from III./JG52 dive into attack a group of Russian fighters high over Zaporozhye in south-east Ukraine, their Kommandeur Hauptmann Günther Rall pounces on a Soviet La-5 to claim his 222nd victory.  During this astonishing one month period Rall shot down 40 aircraft and at the end of November 1943 achieved 250 victories - at the time only the second Ace to do so after Walter Nowotny.  By the time he was posted back to the West, he was well on the way to his final score of 275 victories, making him the third highest-scoring Ace in history.  Had he not been wounded in action numerous times and forced to spend months in hospital, he might well have been the highest-scoring Ace of them all.

Knight of the Reich by Robert Taylor.
 The engineers at Rolls-Royce had worked their magic.  They had somehow managed to squeeze every available ounce of power out of the current Merlin engine and by D-Day on 6 June 1944 the sleek Mk.IX Spitfires of Fighter Command reigned supreme in the skies over Normandy.  The magnificent Mk.IXs were, by far, the most numerous variant of Spitfires that fought from D-Day to the threshold of the Reich.  In the great drive from Normandy across northern France, Belgium and into Holland the Spitfire pilots of Fighter Command threw down the gauntlet to any Luftwaffe pilots brave enough, or foolhardy enough, to tangle with them.  Perhaps the greatest pilot to ever fly the Spitfire was the RAF&39;s top fighter Ace Johnnie Johnson.  His resolute determination and steadfast leadership came into its own during D-Day and the subsequent advance through Normandy, and he would finish the war as the highest scoring Allied Ace in Europe.  The scene captures the moment when, as Wing Leader of 127 Canadian Wing, Johnnie is seen leading Mk.IX Spitfires from 421 <i>Red Indian</i> Squadron RCAF out on patrol from their airfield at Evère near Brussels on a cold December morning in 1944.  It is close to the fighting and the German front line so, as the Canadians climb steadily out over the snow clad landscape in the golden light of dawn, they are already alert and on the lookout for the first signs of trouble.

Midwinter Dawn by Robert Taylor.
 Without air supremacy D-Day and the invasion of north-west Europe would never have happened, and the tactical Ninth Air Force played a huge part in securing that position.  The Ninth had fought with distinction from the deserts of North Africa to the invasion of Sicily and the fighting in Italy.  They had spearheaded the assault on Ploesti and, from humble beginnings, had grown into one of the finest and most formidable Air Forces in the USAAF.  Then, in October 1943, the Ninth were sent to England for their greatest challenge so far - providing air support for the US First Army during the forthcoming invasion of Normandy.  By the morning of 6th June 1944 the Ninth was the largest and most effective tactical air force in the world, with over a quarter of a million personnel and more than 3,500 fighters, bombers and troop-carriers under its command.  Amongst them were the P-47s of the 365th Fighter Group - the fearsome <i>Hell Hawks</i> - a unit that by the end of World War Two would become legendary.  Amongst the first to use P-47s as fighter-bombers, the <i>Hell Hawks</i> were hard at work softening up the enemy in the build up to D-Day, dive-bombing bridges, rail lines, gun positions and airfields.  With two 1,000-pound bombs below their wings along with ten 5-in rockets and eight .50 calibre machine guns, their enormous firepower devastated the German defenses on D-Day.  The <i>Hell Hawks</i> supported the army throughout the Normandy campaign, all the way across northern France to the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944, and beyond.  It was a harsh nomadic life, eating and sleeping in tents and moving from one temporary strip to the next.  By the end of hostilities in May 1945 the <i>Hell Hawks</i> had moved through 11 different airfields, more than any other fighter-bomber group in the Ninth Air Force.
Hell Hawks Over Utah by Robert Taylor.
 <p align=center><i>Rising Sun is normally a companion print to The Legend of Colin Kelly.  We have one available to sell individually.</i></b><br>

Rising Sun by Robert Taylor.

 

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Mosquito

Used as a night fighter, fighter bomber, bomber and Photo-reconnaissance, with a crew of two, Maximum speed was 425 mph, at 30,300 feet, 380mph at 17,000ft. and a ceiling of 36,000feet, maximum range 3,500 miles. the Mosquito was armed with four 20mm Hospano cannon in belly and four .303 inch browning machine guns in nose. Coastal strike aircraft had eight 3-inch Rockets under the wings, and one 57mm shell gun in belly. The Mossie at it was known made its first flight on 25th November 1940, and the mosquito made its first operational flight for the Royal Air Force as a reconnaissance unit based at Benson. In early 1942, a modified version (mark II) operated as a night fighter with 157 and 23 squadron's. In April 1943 the first De Haviland Mosquito saw service in the Far east and in 1944 The Mosquito was used at Coastal Command in its strike wings. Bomber Commands offensive against Germany saw many Mosquitos, used as photo Reconnaissance aircraft, Fighter Escorts, and Path Finders. The Mosquito stayed in service with the Royal Air Force until 1955. and a total of 7781 mosquito's were built.

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All Our Latest Aviation Releases : 

 Richard Taylor's stunning painting depicts the men of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division as they take inventory of their equipment during the early evening of 5 June 1944.  Adorned with hastily applied invasion stripes, the C-47s of the 438th Troop Carrier Group stand primed, ready to carry the elite unit to Normandy in the early hours of D-Day 1944.  To add to the poignancy of this release, the edition is personally signed by veterans that jumped on D-Day with the 101st Airborne.

Eve of Destiny by Richard Taylor.
 The Hurricane was the RAF's first fighter capable of flying at over 300mph and proved to be one of the most rugged fighters in the history of combat aviation.  Hurricanes fought with distinction in the Battle of France and, during the Battle of Britain, shot down more enemy aircraft than its famous counterpart, the Spitfire.  Richard Taylor's superb painting hints at the bitter fighting that lies ahead.  A few months ago they had been fighting for their lives during the Battle of Britain but for now the snow-clad tranquility of an English winter brings a brief, but welcome, relief for the Mk.1 Hurricane pilots of 87 Squadron.

Winter Combat by Richard Taylor.
Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later – Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos – and one of the most savage – Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.
 The swaggering figure of the Reichsmarshal swept imperiously into the Air Ministry on Berlin's Wilhemstrasse, his jewel-encrusted baton and extravagant uniform as flamboyant as ever. This was Saturday, 30th January 1943, the tenth Anniversary of the Nazi Party coming to power, and Goering was about to deliver the main speech in tribute to the Party and its leader, the Fuhrer - Adolf Hitler.  The Royal Air Force had other plans for the anniversary.  In stark defiance of the imagined air security safeguarding Berlin, brave pilots of 105 and 139 Sqn's took to the air in de Havilland Mosquitoes, on course for Germany.  Their mission: RAF Bomber Command's first daylight raid on Berlin!  The raid was timed to perfection and three Mosquitoes of 105 Sqn raced headlong, low level towards their target - the Haus des Rundfunks, headquarters of the German State broadcasting company.  It was an hour before Goering could finally be broadcast.  He was boiling with rage and humiliation.  A few hours later, adding further insult, Mosquitoes from 139 Sqn swept over the city in a second attack moments before Goebbels addressed a Nazi mass rally in the Sportpalast.  Goering's promise that enemy aircraft would never fly over the Reich was broken, the echo of that shame would haunt him for the rest of the war.  This  dramatic painting pays tribute to this pivotal moment in the war, capturing the Mosquito B.Mk.IVs of 105 Sqn departing the target area, following their successful strike on the Haus des Rundfunk.

Strike on Berlin by Anthony Saunders.
 Godwin von Brumowski's 13th victory against an Italian Macchi seaplane over Grado, in northern Italy.

Lucky 13 by Ivan Berryman.
 B-17G 2107027 is depicted limping home to Bassingbourn with the starboard outer propeller feathered following a raid during the Summer of 1944.  'Hikin' for Home' served with the 322nd Bomb Sqn, 91st Bomb Group as part of the 8th Air Force.  Escorting her home is Major George Preddy, the highest scoring P-51 pilot and sixth in the list of all-time top American Aces, seen here flying 413321 'Cripes a Mighty 3rd'.

Hikin' for Home by Ivan Berryman.
Wellington Mk.III X3671 of 156 Sqn piloted by P/O Fox is depicted laying mines in the Estuary of the Loire on the night of 16th April 1942 in the Bay of Biscay.  Just three days later, P/O Fox failed to return from a similar 'Gardening' sortie whilst flying Wellington X3485.

A Spot of Gardening by Ivan Berryman.
 Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane is shown flying Spitfire Vb BM308 of No.154 Sqn based at Southend in 1942.

Tribute to Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane by Ivan Berryman.

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Running the Gauntlet by Robert Taylor. (B)

Running the Gauntlet by Robert Taylor. (B)
Price : £275.00
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Vital Support by Robert Taylor. (B)
Vital Support by Robert Taylor. (B)
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Rolling Thunder by Robert Taylor (AP)

Rolling Thunder by Robert Taylor (AP)
Price : £325.00
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Milne Bay - The Turning Point by Robert Taylor. (C)
Milne Bay - The Turning Point by Robert Taylor. (C)
Price : £395.00
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Air Armada by Robert Taylor. (AP)
Air Armada by Robert Taylor. (AP)
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The name Robert Taylor has been synonymous with aviation art over a quarter of a century. His paintings of aircraft, more than those of any other artist, have helped popularise a genre which at the start of this remarkable artist's career had little recognition in the world of fine art. When he burst upon the scene in the mid-1970s his vibrant, expansive approach to the subject was a revelation. His paintings immediately caught the imagination of enthusiasts and collectors alike . He became an instant success. As a boy, Robert seemed always to have a pencil in his hand. Aware of his natural gift from an early age, he never considered a career beyond art, and with unwavering focus, set out to achieve his goal. Leaving school at fifteen, he has never worked outside the world of art. After two years at the Bath School of Art he landed a job as an apprentice picture framer with an art gallery in Bath, the city where Robert has lived and worked all his life. Already competent with water-colours the young apprentice took every opportunity to study the works of other artists and, after trying his hand at oils, quickly determined he could paint to the same standard as much of the art it was his job to frame. Soon the gallery was selling his paintings, and the owner, recognising Roberts talent, promoted him to the busy picture-restoring department. Here, he repaired and restored all manner of paintings and drawings, the expertise he developed becoming the foundation of his career as a professional artist. Picture restoration is an exacting skill, requiring the ability to emulate the techniques of other painters so as to render the damaged area of the work undetectable. After a decade of diligent application, Robert became one of the most capable picture restorers outside London. Today he attributes his versatility to the years he spent painstakingly working on the paintings of others artists. After fifteen years at the gallery, by chance he was introduced to Pat Barnard, whose military publishing business happened also to be located in the city of Bath. When offered the chance to become a full-time painter, Robert leapt at the opportunity. Within a few months of becoming a professional artist, he saw his first works in print. Roberts early career was devoted to maritime paintings, and he achieved early success with his prints of naval subjects, one of his admirers being Lord Louis Mountbatten. He exhibited successfully at the Royal Society of Marine Artists in London and soon his popularity attracted the attention of the media. Following a major feature on his work in a leading national daily newspaper he was invited to appear in a BBC Television programme. This led to a string of commissions for the Fleet Air Arm Museum who, understandably, wanted aircraft in their maritime paintings. It was the start of Roberts career as an aviation artist. Fascinated since childhood by the big, powerful machines that man has invented, switching from one type of hardware to another has never troubled him. Being an artist of the old school, Robert tackled the subject of painting aircraft with the same gusto as with his large, action-packed maritime pictures - big compositions supported by powerful and dramatic skies, painted on large canvases. It was a formula new to the aviation art genre, at the time not used to such sweeping canvases, but one that came naturally to an artist whose approach appeared to have origins in an earlier classical period. Roberts aviation paintings are instantly recognisable. He somehow manages to convey all the technical detail of aviation in a traditional and painterly style, reminiscent of the Old Masters. With uncanny ability, he is able to recreate scenes from the past with a carefully rehearsed realism that few other artists ever manage to achieve. This is partly due to his prodigious research but also his attention to detail: Not for him shiny new factory-fresh aircraft looking like museum specimens. His trade mark, flying machines that are battle-scarred, worse for wear, with dings down the fuselage, chips and dents along the leading edges of wings, oil stains trailing from engine cowlings, paintwork faded with dust and grime; his planes are real! Roberts aviation works have drawn crowds in the international arena since the early 1980s. He has exhibited throughout the US and Canada, Australia, Japan and in Europe. His one-man exhibition at the Smithsonians National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC was hailed as the most popular art exhibition ever held there. His paintings hang in many of the worlds great aviation museums, adorn boardrooms, offices and homes, and his limited edition prints are avidly collected all around the world. A family man with strong Christian values, Robert devotes most of what little spare time he has to his home life. Married to Mary for thirty five years, they have five children, all now grown up. Neither fame nor fortune has turned his head. He is the same easy-going, gentle character he was when setting out on his painting career all those years ago, but now with a confidence that comes with the knowledge that he has mastered his profession.

 

 

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